THE DEATH OF AKBAR: ‘THE GREATEST’

04.10.2018

THE DEATH OF AKBAR: ‘THE GREATEST’

Akbar (Djelfor), the PA stallion, has died at the age of 28 in Italy where he was owned in partnership by Mattia Cadrobbi (of Pine Stud fame), Fulvio Bonazza and Alessandro Martinazzi. The word Akbar in Arabic translates as the greatest and this word certainly resonates as regards the racing and stallion career of this particular horse. Originally bought by Renée-Laure Koch, Akbar was later resold, via the agent Patrick Barbe, to race in Abu Dhabi. As tough as teak, he won fourteen times and was placed twenty-three times in a fourty race career,  during which time he crossed swords with a mare who was to prove in a class of her own: Unchainedd Melody. The latter is also the dam of Munjiz. Having topped the United Arab Emirates stallion rankings in terms of the number of winners generated on several occasions, Akbar also joined a very exclusive club as two of his progeny, Séraphin du Paon (Akbar) and Mizzna, whose dam was none other than his aforementioned rival Unchainedd Melody, went on to capture the Dubai Kahayla Classic (Gr. I PA). Akbar was part of the stallion band at the Haras Nationaux, but functioned in a ‘semi-retirement’ capacity during his time in Italy. His adopted homeland was also where his last foals were born. Several of his sons are active in France and namely Séraphin du Paon (Haras de Thouars), Nieshan (Haras de Carrère) and Snoopi. The Martial Boisseuil-bred Akbar was out of Fantasia (Gosse du Béarn), a full sister to Flipper (Gosse du Béarn). The breeder said: "I bought Fantasia who was an elderly and ailing broodmare at the time, and whose owners had wanted to have her put down. I then bred her to Djelfor: a stallion who has passed on a lot of quality but whose progeny weren’t always ‘managed’ to their best advantage. The outcome of this cross was Akbar and his results as a great stallion, as they say, are there for all to see. Purebred Arabian horses hailing from this ‘line’ can get a little warm and wound up and, sometimes in the parade ring, they are on their toes. However, once on the track, they show that they can motor. Once you begin to understand them, they are both tough and courageous. Akbar proved capable of winning at distances from 1,200 meter to 2,400 meter. He is the first French-bred to have won the Emir’s Sword."